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Mar 292018
 

ENGLAND’S MEMORABLE ACCIDENTS, 1642.

Wednesday, the 26th October.

The King’s Souldiers bare ransacked and spoiled the Lord Spencer’s house and Parke, neer Banbury, and the Lord Spencer’s house is also plundered in Northampton-shire by the Cavaliers, although the said Lord hath long attended the King, and sideth with them.

Thursday, the 3 of Novem.  

The Lord Generall sent a special messenger to the Parliament, to advertise them of his present intentions and affaires, which messenger relateth that his Lordship, with his whole Army, consisting of 12,000 horse and foot, and 37 pieces of Ordnance, marched yesterday out of Northampton to Oulney, in Buckingham-shire, and intended to be this night at Brickhill, and he saith that all his souldiers. together with the Ministers, are well, lusty, and merry, and better able to doe service than when they first went from hence, being endured to cold, labour, travell, fasting, wind,  and wet, and that they are of suc. undaunted courages that they feare no colours nor dangers.

Monday, 14th of Novemb.

The Deputy Lieutenants of Darbyshire, Leiceshire, and Nottinghamshire are to meet the committee at Oundle, in Northamptonshire, to consult of securing those counties from pillaging robbers. The inhabitants of Darby Town contribute largely towards the present affairs; some of them a £100 some £50, according to their present severall abilities.

Saturday, the 19tb of November.    

The ten Counties Northwards that have lately associated themselves have done it by a speciall and particular order from both the Houses of Parliament, and they are now raising of 1,500 Dragooneers, whereof the County of Darby finds 100, Nottingham 100, Lincolne 330, Leicester and Rutland 200, Northampton 300, Bedford, Cambridge, and Huntingdon 300, and the County of Warwick 200.

Monday, 21st of Novemb.          

The Parliament hath given a Speciall License to the Counties of Bedford, Cambridge, Darby, Huntingdon, Leicester, Lincolne, Northampton, Nottingham, Rutland, and Warwick, to associate themselves in hae verba. “Novr. 19, 1642. It is this day Ordered by the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, that the County of, &c., may enter into an Association for their defence and safety, and that such and such persons, &c., shall be a committee to meet at such time and place as they shall thinke fit for raiding of men, horse, armes, or ammunition, and ordering all things necessary thereunto, and that the Lord Gray, Son to the Earle of Stamford Hall, command in chiefe the forces to be so raised and have power to Traine and carry the said Forces to such  places as lie shall think fit, and to subdue, fight with, kill, and slay, and imprison all such persons as shall levy War without the consent of both Houses of Parliament.”

Certain Information from severall parts of the Kingdome.
From the 13 of November till the 20 of November, 1643.

The Cavaliers of late have faced the Towne of Northampton once or twice, expecting to have it betrayed unto them by one Captain Palmer, but his treachery was discovered, for which he is sentenced by a Counsell of Warre to be shot to death.


Northampton Mercury – Saturday 26 February 1881
© THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
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 Posted by at 7:25 pm
Mar 282018
 

A series of historical notes appeared in Northampton Mercury from February 1875 onwards and ran for the next ten years. Titled “Antiquarian Memoranda” they often contained historical material relating to Northamptonshire, sometimes contributed by John Taylor.


Antiquarian Memoranda

We find several curious particulars concerning the Army and divers of the “separation” at Towcester at the time of the Civil War, in a rare tract, entitled —

” The Prerogative Priests Passing-Bell, or Amen to the Rigid Clergy. Showing the Usefulness, Equity, Lawfulness, and Necessity, of private persons to take upon them Preaching or Expounding of the Scriptures, having a call thereto * * * * Calculated on purpose for the Metropolis of Northamptonshire, and may serve indifferently for the Meridian of most places in other Horizons, especially for those parts that are in conjunction with the Northern Climate.”

By William Hartley.
* * * * London, 1651.

These we give below :—

December 31, 1646. The Commons assembled in Parliament, do Declare, That they do dislike, and will proceed against all such persons, as shall take upon them to preach or expound the Scriptures, in any Church or Chappel, or other publique place, except they be ordained either here, or in any other reformed Church, Ac. * * * * * It is the grief of every humane-like spirit to see Mordecai favored, although he justly may have merited the same, and what care and industry the Presbyterated party do take to render both persons and meetings of the Separation odious in the eyes of the Magistrate and people, for taste thereof, I thought good to insert the carriage of Mr. Parmer, and Gore, &c., of Towciter, whose malicious and envious spirit could not be satisfied in setting Major Ducket’s troopers to fall upon us with their naked swords, while Captain Elliot was speaking, but also caused many notorious falsehoods to be inserted in the weekly news books; viz.:— “A Tumultuous Meeting”; “Tompson’s Party, Levellers”; “Ranters, Erroneous Fellows.” For as much as this is not the first time that we have been abused in this nature (as is well known to some godly and eminent governors of this Common-Wealth), it would favour of unanswerable improvidence if we should not faithfully endeavour to wash off that dirt which is so unworthily cast in the faces of us.

Upon the first day (commonly called Whit-Sunday), divers of the Separation met at Cornet Reads house in Towciter, and after one friend had exercised his gifts, the Auditory lid exceed the room, and by reason of the throng, it was moved, for better conveniency, to go into the yard, which being of less continent than the room, by the advise of the soldiery there present, and some friends under the penthouse without door (taking the benefit of shade) was adjudged a convenient place; there Capt. Elliot (much about the time of the ending of the evening Exercise at the publique place, spake a word of exhortation, and the people gave him peaceable audience. Now that this Meeting might degenerate to tumultuous disturbance of the Peace, that must wholly lie at the door of Farmer, Gore, and their adherents, who incensed the soldiery; but by the wise carriage of the officers the business was easily appeased. Seriously this is hard measure, when Christians shall be denyed that liberty which is commonly afforded to those unreasonable creatures who lick the crumbs of our tables.

2. We are branded for Tompson’s Party; I cannot tell what to say to this allegation, seeing Tompson (his fury working his own destruction) is now under ground; but upon enquiry this is gathered, that there was one at the meeting that adhered to him, and by the Councel of State acquitted long since. Now if a convention of people must be measured by a single person, by these men’s reason Sodomites were all righteous, because one Lot inhabited the city.

For the word Leveller is a term of odium cast upon many a person for holding forth of righteous principles: for those who deny propriety under pretence of community, as we have no communion with them in such a principle, so see we no reason to debar them from hearing of the word preached.

3. Ranters, erroneous fellows, &c. For calling those that met ranters, if their passion had not quite eat up their reason this sentence would not have passed, there being neither beer, wine, women, or any other object which might provoke licentiousness made use of; besides, those who are involved in so sad condition, of necessity must turn Apostates into prayer and preaching. Now, had not the envy of the elder brother been too prevalent with them, if there came any of that judgment to the Exercise out of good intention, ought it not to be a matter of rejoicing? I am sure Jesus Christ saith there is joy in heaven upon the like occasion.

And that the mouth of envy may be fully stopped take a view of a letter directed to Mr. Benson, commissioner of the Peace, viz.
Sir,— It is related you are dissatisfied with the meeting of some dissenting from the public worship, and that myself should assume the publique place which thing never entered into my intention; however we may be mispresented through malice or misprison, yet know that our actions will manifest all peaceable obedience to the present power, to whom, with yourself, I am,

A ready servant,         WILL HARTLEY.

J. T., Northampton.


Northampton Mercury – Saturday 05 April 1879
© THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

 

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 Posted by at 8:52 pm
Mar 272018
 

A series of historical notes appeared in Northampton Mercury from October 1886 onwards and ran for the next three and a half years. Titled “Things old and new” it often contain historical items relating to Northamptonshire, sometimes contributed by John Taylor.

184.—THE LEVELLERS AT NORTHAMPTON

Interesting particulars of the Levellers in the Parliamentary Army of 1649 are to be found in the British Museum collection of the Perfect Diurnall Nos. 303 and 304, from which I quote in extenso, being an historical episode in our town’s history.

J. T., Northampton.

The Headquarters at Oxford, May 19, 1649. News since came that Thompson the chiefe Leader hath possessed Northampton with two Troops of Horse, and since their comming thither many (called Levellers) from the Countrey are come to them. They have seized the Ordnance, Magazine, and monies there, yet for all you may heare they will be oatcht in a Net.

Beginning Munday, May 21, 1649.

This day a Letter was read in the house from his Excellency the Lord Fairfax, of the surprizing a party of Horse under command of Thompson chiefe leader of those called Levellers, who as we told you in the last with a small party not above 15 horse had surprized Northampton, and the manner of his being slain in the Wood neere Wellingborough, the particulars briefly thus: Major Butler, of Col. Reynoldss Regiment being sent with a select party of horse to fall into Thompsons quarters, he being gone from Northampton to a place called Wellingborough, where all his party where surprized, but Thompson escaped into a Wood, of which having intelligence, we pursued him, and beset the Wood, and sent a party into the Wood, where they found Thompson well mounted, who, being alone, yet rid up to our party and desperately shot a Cornet, and wounded another, and retreated to his bush, receiving two shots; when they began again to draw neer unto him he charged again with his Pistol, and received another shot, and retreated; the third time he came up (for he said he scornd to take quarter) Major Butlers Corporall with a Carbine charged with Seven Bullets gave Thompson his deaths wound. The Lieutenant of the Oxfordshire Troop, who joyned Thompson, is likewise taken, who it seemeth seized on the Magazine of Northampton, and the Excise Money.

The house hereupon ordered that the Commissioners of the great Seale of England be required to issue ont Commissions of Oyer and Terminer under the great Seale, in the Counties of Oxon and Northampton, for trying such persons as are in prison in Oxon and Northampton, being taken in Arms against the Commonwealth in the last Rebellion, and that the Lords Commissioners do consider of and appoint fit persons to be Commissioners therein.

Thursday, May 22nd, 1649.

By a particular Expresse from Northampton this day is certified:

Sir,—Our Town hath been this week the Scene of News, Thompson the Declaration maker with some dozen in his Company stole into this Town late on Wednesday night, and on Thursday morning at Sermon time went to the Goale and demanded his friends there imprisoned, threatning death to any that should oppose, the Jaylor himselfe not being within, and the under Jaylor not daring to oppose, he took them out, but no more, and then rode with his company up and down the Town to all the Gates, and gave out that 700 men were to be quartered here that night, and that they would deliver the Nation from oppression of all sorts, and so went to see the Ordnance and Ammunition, and took the Keys into their owne hands, and then went to the Market crosse and read his Declaration, and made a speech to those that came about him, that he would free them from Excise, Free quarter, Taxes, and Tythes, and exhorted all men to assist him in so good a work; and then went to the Excise Office and took all the money he there found, and gave much to the poor people that flockt about him and prayd for him. After that he enquired for Drums, and fetcht them where he found them, and beat them all about the Town, and a Serjeant made proclamation that those who would list themselves should be well entertained: Then he went to the Mayor and demanded the Keys of the Town hall, because he heard there were Arms and Ammunition there; but was answered that it was the Towns and should not be at his dispose. Next morning he and all his Company came to the Mayor and demanded the Key again, but were denied as before. All this while no body stird, I being engaged because it was Lecture day, was not informed of any thing; but Friday noon I went to Mr. Mayor to satisfie my selfe how this impudence of a few men could be so swallowed in this Town, that was not went to carry ooals so patiently? he told me he had summoned his brethren and very few came, and those devided in their judgements what to do, told him, He spake well and they believed had a great party, for not onely the old Malignants and rabble of poore people would be for him, but all Sectaries in Town an Countrey, because he promises to pull down Tythes and Ministers that we had no horse to oppose theirs, and they would quell our foot as soon as any preparation should be made, or arms put into their hands; neither knew we whom to trust, all men were so unsatisfied, and taken with his grounds, that it was lawfull to repell force with force and if they should engage and get the worst the Town would be destroyed; that he had sent to Sir Gilbert Pickering and divers of the Committee, and had no encouragement to meddle, but was perswaded that it was best to let them take their course, so long as they were neither insolent nor injurious unto any, but very civill, and payd for what they took, and that he was certainly enformed the Generall had utterly defeated those at Burford, and was upon his march this way, and would finde these men carelesse. I told him it would be no thank to us if it were wholy done without us, and that we might inform the Generall privately, and see what answer we should have.

As we were talking one brought word that his new listed men were marching out of the Town much afraid, and had set scouts on all the passes toward Oxford, where it was believed the Generall was, Yet they were perswaded to write presently to the Generall how things were, and because it should not be discovered one of the Alderman, being a Physician, put the Letter in the bottom of a Box with Pils, and directed them to one in Witney whom he knew. Thompson himselfe made no haste to go out of the Town until the evening, and then went not above six miles to Walgrave, where he and his company being about 21 foot and nine or ten horse quartered; and were so confident (because they found so little opposition at Northampton) that the Generals Forlorn hope was with them in the morning before they stird out of their quarters; he was on horseback himselfe and might have escaped, but had engaged overnight not to desert his foot, and so stirred not but stayd their comming, and ohargd three severall times himselfe, and went off gallantly, and led them thus some three miles, but being shot and bleeding, leapt into a Wood with his horse, and routed those that first pursued him on horseback, and being offered quarter told them he scorned it; but one of Major Butlers Troop left his horse and having a good Carbine waylaied him in the bushes he heard him comming, and having a fair shot him with a trace of Bulletts so that began to stagger, and the fellow to make sure him a good blow with the end of his Carbine and feld him, and so died William Thompson, and was brought Saturday night into this Town, there was but one slain, not outright, but dead by this time. Poore Northampton for their want of valour punished with the free quarter of about 800 horse and men, and left to be censored as please men. I liked not their politicke cowardinesse, because I thought it might invite mere of that kind, the Lord helpe this poor kingdom, there is no trusting these men, they made many believe that severall Commanders of note would presently be with them with a great brigade of horse, Mrs. Thompson bearing of her husband’s death, being great with child and near her time, fell in labour, and both she and her child are dead.

We are desired by the Licencer M. Jenings to insert thus much, That whereas for some Weeks past there was a Sheet published, called The Scout Printed on Fridayes for Robert Wood, he wil from henceforth upon good grounds deny Licence to the said Sheet for that day, as also some other Sheets of as little satisfaction to the Kingdom.


Northampton Mercury – Saturday 20 August 1887
© THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

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 Posted by at 6:45 pm
Feb 082018
 

John Taylor“A Victorian Blogger”

John Taylor was the son of a Northampton printer and publisher of the same names; he was born in Northampton on April 13th, 1831. John was educated at Northampton Grammar School, at a private school run by a Mr Emery, in College Street, Northampton, and for two years at the Castle Hill School operated by the Rev. William Jarrom, for two years the General Baptist minister in the town. When Mr Jarrom left for work in China, John was sent to James Linnett’s school at Towcester. Apprenticed to the printing trade in Northampton and London, he returned to Northampton in 1853, joined his father in business, and added a second-hand book line to the business at the premises at 22, Gold Street. His father retired in 1862, and after his father died in 1864 John succeeded to the full control of a printing and stationery business. Unfortunately for his business success, but happily for Northamptonshire bibliography, John Taylor’s love of books and an ever-present anxiety to collect every scrap of Northamptonshire’s history, overshadowed everything else.

His father was one of the promoters of the General Baptist cause in Northampton which met for some years in the Kingswell Street chapel. When the General Baptist cause in Northampton ceased to function, John Taylor joined the College Street Baptist Church, and it was he who was largely responsible for raising the funds which put up the new chapel in College Street1 . His connection with the Baptists all his life made him keenly interested in the history of the denomination. He was the best authority on early Baptist history in this part of the country, and for very many years he worked at an important volume on Confessions of Faith. A copy of “The Faith and Practise of thirty Baptized Churches” in the Midlands (dated 1651) was to be the centre of an exhaustive collection of Confessions of Faith from all parts of the world, and the basis for biographies of the signatories, and histories of the Churches they represented, but he died with the work incomplete2.

In 1884 Taylor moved his business to premises at 9 College Street and bought a private house in York Road, Northampton, where he lived until his death on August 25th, 1901. John Taylor was twice married. His first wife, who died in 1891, was Miss Sarah Scott, of Leicester. His second wife, who survived him, was Miss Ellen Colson, of Rushden. He left no children.

A Liberal in politics, John Taylor did not take a prominent part in local public affairs; although he had his windows broken over the Bradlaugh disputes, and although he sometimes wrote a critical letter to the newspapers on municipal matters.

His first passion was to buy and handle, and frequently to retain specimens of Northamptonshire printing, or rare volumes of Northamptonshire history. In the long years of his collecting, a copy of almost every known Northamptonshire book, no matter how large or how small or insignificant, passed through his hands. He was at every public sale of books in the district, and he spent much time at the British Museum Library, the Bodleian at Oxford, and the University Library at Cambridge, carefully collating rare specimens of Northamptonshire works. In the course of nearly forty years, he collected and put into type for his Bibliotheca the title page and collation of 30,000 Northamptonshire books. Only six copies were printed, one of which was acquired by the Northampton Public Library3.

Naturally, in the course of his investigations, he came across many unknown items of Northamptonshire history. These he collected and printed, but, curiously never issued until a few weeks before his death, when they were published under the title of “Antiquarian Memoranda.” In 1884 he commenced the “Northamptonshire Notes and Queries” which, issued for twelve years, forms six unique and valuable volumes.

Taylor was a lover of books, and he only parted with his choicest acquisitions with the greatest reluctance. The majority of his collections of books and manuscripts of John Clare and miscellaneous Northamptonshire books are in the Northampton Central Library. He possessed, at the time of his death, unique collections of rare sixteenth-century tracts, Baptist historical literature, Baptist Missionary literature, Northamptonshire engravings and portraits, Northamptonshire poll books and election literature, and historical notes on every village and town in the county. He was a source of reference to others engaged in local history research, knowledge that was willing shared and often writing updates and responses in the local newspapers.

One of his greatest achievements was as part of a group in the 1860s that formed the Northampton Free Library, evolving as the Northampton Public Library and today is still a significant proportion of the local studies collection of the Northampton Central Library.

Sources:
Death of John Taylor, printer and book-lover, Northampton Mercury, Friday 30 August 1901
John Taylor obituary, Notes & Queries Sept. 14, 1901, vol 8 p 223
Northamptonshire Notes & Queries, second series, vol. 1, pp 13-16
Roger Hayden, “John Taylor and the Records of Northants Nonconformity,” Baptist Quarterly 24.7 (July 1972): 342-344

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 Posted by at 9:39 pm
Oct 272017
 

A new map shows the locations of nonconformist chapels within Northampton. Some buildings were used by several different denominations over the years. As a consequence of redevelopment, not all buildings are still in existence, particularly in the central area.

If you zoom and click on the marker of interest full details about the use of the building is shown in the information box.

A complete listing of Northampton Chapels can be found here.

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 Posted by at 6:57 pm
Oct 162017
 
Olaudahn Equiano

Olaudahn Equiano

In life Olaudah Equiano (c. 1745 – 31 March 1797) was known as Gustavus Vassa. Equiano has an unexplained link with the village of Soham in Cambridgeshire, England where he married an English lady, Susannah Cullen in 1792. It was from Soham in 1782 that the Baptist, Andrew Fuller originated before becoming the pastor of Kettering Baptist Church.

Olaudah Equiano together with William Wilberforce and Thomas Clarkson are celebrated by the Church of England on 30th July each year for their efforts in social reform and anti-slavery campaigning.

Until the recently the final resting place of Equiano has been unknown[1]. What we do know is that he lived in London, at 13 Tottenham Street, London, in 1788; in 1789 he moved to what was then 10 Union Street and is now 73 Riding House Street. One of his last addresses appears to have been Plaisterers’ Hall in the City of London, where he drew up his will on 28 May 1796. He moved to John Street, Tottenham Court Road, close to Whitefield’s Methodist chapel. (It was rebuilt in in 1957 following war-time damage by a V2 rocket, for use by Congregationalists, now the site of the American International Church.) Lastly, he lived in Paddington Street, Middlesex, where he died.

Recent research has revealed that following Equiano’s death on 31 March 1797 he was buried at Whitefield’s Methodist chapel on 6 April 1797.[2]

The entry reads “6 [April 1797]  Gustus Vasa, 52 years, St Mary Le bone

We might conclude that Equiano found the Calvinistic message of Whitefield’s chapel to his liking. At the time the chapel was pastored by Rev. Torial Joss, George Whitefield having died in 1770. Joss himself died a few days after Equiano and was buried on 22 April 1797 in the chapel.

Olaudah Equiano burial

Olaudah Equiano burial

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaudah_Equiano#Last_days_and_will

[2] London Metropolitan Archives; Clerkenwell, London, England; Whitefield’s Memorial Church [Formerly Tottenham Court Road Chapel], Tottenham Court Road, Saint Pancras, Register of burials; Reference Code: LMA/4472/A/01/004

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 Posted by at 7:50 pm
Aug 262016
 

Philip Doddridge never enjoyed the best of health. In life he had the appearance of a “bag of bones” and was always running from this place to that in the Lord’s work. When it became clear that his life was close to its end friends and supporters contributed to pay for the cost of him travelling to Lisbon, Portugal for a “change of air”. Sadly he was met by no better weather than he left in England and that journey was to be his last. He died there of tuberculosis on 26 October 1751. He was buried in a cemetery attached to the British Factory in Lisbon.

Philip Doddridge's grave at the British Cemetery Lisbon 2

Philip Doddridge’s grave at the British Cemetery Lisbon

Philip Doddridge's grave at the British Cemetery Lisbon 1

Philip Doddridge’s grave at the British Cemetery Lisbon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pictures kindly supplied by Ed Hanson via http://www.findagrave.com/

More on Philip Doddridge.

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 Posted by at 3:35 pm
Aug 062015
 

The August 2015 edition of Footprints includes an update on Nonconformists in Northamptonshire.

Sources for researching Nonconformists in Northamptonshire

by Graham Ward

The Northamptonshire Family History Society have published a booklet written by myself as a guide to the multitude of resources available when researching nonconformist history and family connections.  Details are available here, together with a summary of the web sites referred to in the booklet.

Available from the Northamptonshire Family History Society bookstall for £2.50 plus postage (UK 45p, airmail £1.40) ISBN 1904460275, First published November 2004, revised 2007.

 

The 1851 Religious Census of Northamptonshire

by Graham Ward

One of the main features of Victorian local history was the balance between the religious denominations, which varied from place to place. The one and only time a religious census was taken in this country was in 1851. This exercise was undertaken alongside the regular census, taken every ten years from 1801. This volume gives a synopsis of the returns of each place of religious worship in every place in the county, and Graham Ward, the editor, explains the problems inherent in the way the census was designed and looks at issues raised by this one and only attempt to measure religious allegiance with statistical precision.

This is a Victor Hatley Memorial volume available from the Northamptonshire Record Society Wotton Hall Park, Northampton, UK, NN4 8BQ  Telephone: 01604 762297. ISBN 0 901275 65 4, 266 pages, Published 2007.  The cost is £9.50 (plus p & p) .

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 Posted by at 8:59 pm
Dec 142014
 
tvclock

Longcase clock of Thomas Vorley of Market Harborough

Thomas Vorley of Market Harborough (1803-1847) was the son of Samuel Vorley (1766-1821). Samuel was born in Great Addington, Northamptonshire, and was a clockmaker. Samuel Vorley’s burial in 1821 at Great Addington records him as a weaver and clockmaker. I have not found any information to indicate when Samuel became a clockmaker or if he was apprenticed.

Thomas appears in trade directories at Market Harborough at two addresses, Church Street in 1831 and High Street 1835. After Thomas’ death in 1847 his last wife Mary died shortly after in 1849. In her will she leaves the property in Great Addington that Thomas owned and was occupied by his mother, since re-married, to his mother and the business and property in Market Harborough was left to the Thomas’s surviving brothers and sisters and daughters of his brother Henry, Elizabeth Fryer Vorley and Louisa Fryer Vorley.

hvclock

Longcase clock of Henry Vorley of Thrapston, Market Harborough and Ipswich

Henry Vorley (1813-1872), another son of Samuel and therefore Thomas’s brother, appears in Pigot’s directory for 1841 already in business in Thrapston as a watchmaker. Henry’s first wife Charlotte died in Market Harborough in 1855. The trade directory of 1855 confirms that Henry had moved his business to Market Harborough after his brother’s death in 1847. Some time later Henry moved to Colchester as he married Jane Huxtable in Colchester at a Eld Lane Baptist Chapel in 1856. Here he is described as a jeweller living at Butt Road, Colchester. I have found no clue as to what prompted the move to Colchester or whether it was a family or business opportunity. Two of his daughters Elizabeth Fryer Vorley and Louisa Fryer Vorley, married in Ipswich in 1860 and 1861. Checking the trade directories of Colchester and Ipswich has not indicated that Henry was trading on his own account but it is possible that he was working in a watchmaking business in Colchester as it was a significant industry in the town. Henry was buried back in Great Addington in 1872 when he was still described as a watchmaker.

There was a third brother, Samuel John Vorley (1821-1858) Samuel John’s career and movements can be put together from his two marriages, census and trade directories. In 1839 his marriage to Mary Ann Tomlin gives his residence as Rothwell and describes him as a watchmaker. Pigot’s 1841 directory lists a John Vorley, watchmaker at Corby, which as it is only six miles from Rothwell is probably the same Samuel John. At his second marriage in 1844 in Irthlingborough he is living at Higham Ferrers and is again described as a watchmaker. In 1851 he is living at Church Street, Crowland, Lincolnshire. The births of his children indicate that he probably moved from Crowland to Leicester between 1854 and 1855. In 1857 his daughter Mary Louisa Vorley was born in Leicester and Samuel John is described as a watchmaker (master).

Graham Ward

(This article originally appeared in Clocks Magazine, July 2007)

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 Posted by at 4:00 pm
Nov 282014
 

If you are looking for transcriptions of non-conformist records in Northamptonshire the Eureka Partnership have started a series of booklets containing many records they have located and transcribed. Details of their Northamptonshire collection is here.

Also remember that nonconformists often travelled some distance to attend the chapel of their choice, so it is often wise to look for chapels across the county boundary.  Some of the other counties that have been transcribed are Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, Warwickshire and Oxfordshire.

Currently the following records have been published for Northamptonshire:

TitleDescriptionDenominationEureka reference
Buckingham and Brackley Methodist Circuit - Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire Baptisms 1804-1903This booklet contains a transcription of the baptisms relating to persons from Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire contained in the registers of the Buckingham and Brackley Methodist Circuit held at the Northamptonshire Record Office. Also included is a register of marriages 1870-1885 and a register of burials, 1846-1894, in the Wesleyan Chapel Ground at Brackley. Northamptonshire chapels in the Circuit at various times were situated at Brackley, Croughton, Evenley, Greatworth, Syresham and Whitfield and those from Oxfordshire were situated at Arncott, Bicester, Caulcott, Clifton, Deddington, Fritwell, Hethe, Lower and Upper Heyford, Launton, North Aston, Piddington and Weston on the Green. Wesleyan MethodistEUR062
Towcester Methodist Circuit - Baptisms 1811-1919The Towcester Methodist Circuit included chapels at Alderton, Ashton, Astcote in the parish of Pattishall, Blakesley, Grafton Regis, Greens Norton, Hartwell, Maidford, Paulerspury, Shutlanger, Silverstone, Slapton, Stoke Bruerne, Towcester, Wappenham and Whittlebury [all Northamptonshire].Wesleyan MethodistEUR116
Banbury Wesleyan Methodist Circuit - Historic Roll 1899-1904The Wesleyan Methodist Historic Roll contains the names and addresses of members who donated a guinea each to the Wesleyan Methodist Million Guinea Fund between the years 1899 and 1904. Also listed are those loved ones who had either died or moved away and for whom members made additional donations 'In Memoriam'.
This booklet contains a trancription of the pages within the Historic Roll relating to the Banbury Circuit, which included places of worship at Adderbury, Banbury, Bloxham, Cropredy, Hanwell, Horley, Shutford, Wardington and Wroxton [all Oxfordshire], Chacombe, Chipping Warden, Eydon, Greatworth, Grimsbury, Hinton, Lower Boddington, Middleton Cheney, Sulgrave and Upper Boddington [all Northamptonshire] and Shotteswell and Warmington [both Warwickshire].
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Buckingham and Brackley, Thame and Watlington Wesleyan Methodist Circuits - Historic Roll 1899-1904This booklet contains a transcription of the pages within the Historic Roll relating to the Buckingham and Brackley, Thame and Watlington Circuits. Buckingham and Brackley Circuit included places of worship at Adstock, Akeley, Buckingham, Padbury and Thornborough [all Buckinghamshire], Bicester, Clifton, Hethe and Somerton [all Oxfordshire], and Brackley and Croughton [both Northamptonshire]. The Thame Circuit included places of worship at Bledlow, Brill, Cuddington, Haddenham and Ludgershall [all Buckinghamshire] and Thame [Oxfordshire]. Watlington Circuit included places of worship at Britwell Salome, Chalgrove, Christmas Common, Drayton, Ewelme, Great Milton, Little Milton, Warborough and Watlington [all Oxfordshire] and Wallingford [Berkshire].Wesleyan MethodistEUR243
Rugby and Daventry Wesleyan Methodist Circuit Volume One - Daventry District Baptisms 1802-1837Within the Rugby and Daventry Circuit separate baptismal registers existed for chapels in the Daventry area and for chapels in the Rugby area. This arrangement continued up to and beyond 1860 when Rugby Wesleyan Circuit and Daventry Wesleyan Circuit were established as separate entities.
This booklet contains a transcription of the baptisms recorded in the registers for the Daventry area, which included places of worship at Braunston, Daventry, Hellidon, Kilsby, Long Buckby, Weedon and West Haddon [all Northamptonshire] and at Priors Marston [Warwickshire] between 1802 and 1837 inclusive.
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Towcester and Wolverton Wesleyan Methodist Circuits - Historic Roll 1899-1904The Wesleyan Methodist Historic Roll contains the names and addresses of members who donated a guinea each to the Wesleyan Methodist Million Guinea Fund between the years 1899 and 1904. Also listed are those loved ones who had either died or moved away and for whom members made additional donations 'In Memoriam'.
This booklet contains a transcription of the pages within the Historic Roll relating to the Towcester and Wolverton Circuits, which included places of worship at Towcester and Whittlebury [Northamptonshire], Bletchley, Bow Brickhill, Castlethorpe, Fenny Stratford, Hanslope, Newport Pagnell, Old Bradwell, Sherington, Simpson, Stony Stratford, Woburn Sands and Wolverton [all Buckinghamshire] and Aspley Guise, Cranfield and Woburn [all Bedfordshire].
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Northampton and Daventry Wesleyan Methodist Circuits - Historic Roll 1899-1904.The Wesleyan Methodist Historic Roll contains the names and addresses of members who donated a guinea each to the Wesleyan Methodist Million Guinea Fund between the years 1899 and 1904. Also listed are those loved ones who had either died or moved away and for whom members made additional donations 'In Memoriam'. This booklet cotains a transcription of the pages within the Historic Roll relating to the Northampton (Gold Street), Northampton (Queens Road) and Daventry Circuits which included places of worship at Braunston, Brixworth, Charwelton, Daventry, Holcot, Northampton, Roade, Weedon and West Haddon [all Northamptonshire] and at Priors Marston and Willoughby [both Warwickshire].Wesleyan MethodistEUR326
Wellingborough, Higham Ferrers and Raunds Wesleyan Methodist Circuits - Historic Roll
1899-1904.
The Wesleyan Methodist Historic Roll contains the names and addresses of members who donated a guinea each to the Wesleyan Methodist Million Guinea Fund between the years 1899 and 1904. Also listed are those loved ones who had either died or moved away and for whom members made additional donations 'In Memoriam'.
This booklet contains a transcription of the pages within the Historic Roll relating to the Wellingborough, Higham Ferrers and Raunds Circuits, which included places of worship at Bozeat, Denford, Earls Barton, Finedon, Hargrave, Harrowden, Higham Ferrers, Irchester, Irthlingborough, Little Addington, Mears Ashby, Raunds, Ringstead, Rushden, Stanwick, Thrapston, Titchmarsh, Wellingborough, Wilby, Wollaston and Woodford [all Northamptonshire], at Dean, Knotting Green, Riseley, Souldrop, Swineshead and Yielden [all Bedfordshire] and at Catworth [Huntingdonshire].
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Middleton Cheney Baptist Church - Births 1785-1837; Burials 1789-1793; Members 1781-1841The Baptist Church at Middleton Cheney is believed to date from about 1740 when members met at the house of Mr. Merrivale in Main Road, now the New Inn. The present chapel was built in 1806 and replaced an earlier, smaller, building thought to be located in Queen Street. The church is now known as Middleton Cheney Baptist Centre. This volume contains a transcription of the church birth, burial and membership records deposited at Northamptonshire Record Office.
Members of the church resided at Chacombe, Kings Sutton, Marston St. Lawrence, Middleton Cheney, Moreton Pinkney, Sulgrave, Thenford and Thorpe Mandeville [all Northamptonshire] and in Adderbury, Banbury, Cropredy and Great Bourton [all Oxfordshire].
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Roade Baptist Church - Births 1816-1837 and Members 1730-1912.The Baptist Church at Roade is said to have been founded in 1688 by John Gibbs of Newport Pagnell, who also founded the church at Olney, Bucks. The earliest surviving records date from 1730 when Richard Leaper, also from Olney, became minister. The present chapel, which is now a private residence, was built in 1802 and replaced an earlier building erected in 1737.
This volume contains a transcription of the church birth and membership records together with extracts from the minutes. Members of the Church resided at Ashton, Blisworth, Courteenhall, Milton Malsor, Quinton, Roade and Stoke Bruerne [all Northamptonshire] and in Gayhurst, Hanslope and Loughton [all Buckinghamshire].
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Wellingborough Wesleyan Methodist Circuit - Volume One - Baptisms 1809-1857.The Wellingborough Wesleyan Methodist Circuit had places of worship at Bozeat, Burton Latimer,
Earls Barton, Finedon, Grendon, Hannington, Harrowden, Irchester, Isham, Mears Ashby, Orlingbury, Wellingborough, Wilby and Wollaston [all Northamptonshire].
This volume contains a transcription of the baptismal entries found in the circuit registers for the period 1809 to 1857 inclusive.
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Wellingborough Wesleyan Methodist Circuit - Volume Two - Baptisms 1858-1913.The Wellingborough Wesleyan Methodist Circuit had places of worship at Bozeat, Burton Latimer,
Earls Barton, Finedon, Grendon, Hannington, Harrowden, Irchester, Isham, Mears Ashby, Orlingbury, Wellingborough, Wilby and Wollaston [all Northamptonshire].
This volume contains a transcription of the baptismal entries found in the circuit registers for the period 1858 to 1913 inclusive.
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Kettering & Market Harborough Wesleyan Methodist Circuits - Historic Roll 1899-1904The Wesleyan Methodist Historic Roll contains the names and addresses of members who donated a guinea each to the Wesleyan Methodist Million Guinea Fund between the years 1899 and 1904. Also listed are those loved ones who had either died or moved away and for whom members made additional donations 'In Memoriam'.
This booklet contains a transcription of the pages within the Historic Roll relating to the Kettering and Market Harborough Circuits, including members residing in Broughton, Cottingham, Desborough, Great Oakley, Kettering, Little Oakley, Middleton, Naseby, Pipewell, Pytchley and Rothwell [all Northamptonshire], and at Foxton, Great Bowden, Great Easton, Husbands Bosworth, Kibworth Beauchamp, Little Bowden and Market Harborough [all Leicestershire].
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Northampton Wesleyan Methodist Circuit - Volume One - Baptisms 1808-1862; Burials 1820-1837The Northampton Wesleyan Circuit was formed from the Bedford Circuit in 1808. The 1866-67 Circuit Plan shows places of worship at Billing, Boughton, Brixworth, Collingtree, Duston, Ecton, Far Cotton, Hardingstone, Harpole, Holcot, Houghton, Kislingbury, Moulton, Northampton Gold Street, Northampton Grafton Street, Northampton Scarletwell Street, Pitsford, Quinton, Roade and Weston Favell [all Northamptonshire].
This booklet contains a transcription of those baptismal entries dated between 1808 and 1862 inclusive to be found in the circuit registers deposited at Northamptonshire Record Office. The burials at Gold Street, Northampton Chapel are also included
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Northampton Wesleyan Methodist Circuit - Volume Two - Baptisms 1863-1913The Northampton Wesleyan Circuit was formed from the Bedford Circuit in 1808. The 1866-67 Circuit Plan shows places of worship at Billing, Boughton, Brixworth, Collingtree, Duston, Ecton, Far Cotton, Hardingstone, Harpole, Holcot, Houghton, Kislingbury, Moulton, Northampton Gold Street, Northampton Grafton Street, Northampton Scarletwell Street, Pitsford, Quinton, Roade and Weston Favell [all Northamptonshire].
This booklet contains a transcription of those baptismal entries dated between 1863 and 1913 inclusive to be found in the circuit registers deposited at Northamptonshire Record Office.
Wesleyan MethodistEUR368

 

 

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