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Lost Churches: St Andrew, Northampton

St Andrew Northampton was built in 1841 from public subscription. Its parish was a densely populated area that was originally part of the historic parish of Holy Sepulchre in the town. Known locally as “the Boroughs” it was until this building was erected well served by nonconformist meeting houses. Built of local sandstone it survived […]

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The Missions in the “Boroughs” of Northampton

In the 19th century, despite there being numerous well-established churches of many denominations around the periphery of Northampton’s “Boroughs”, the area was well served by additional premises for Sunday schools, social outreach and worship services. Judging by the many press reports over the years all of these ventures were well supported by the local community […]

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North End 1746 from Noble and Butlin's map of Northampton

Lost streets: Where was North End, Northampton?

North End is referred to in newspaper reports and appears on some maps of Northampton between 1746 and the early part of the 19th century. But where exactly was it and what was its full extent?

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Lost Churches and Religious Houses of Northampton

Previously I have written about several of Northampton’s “lost” churches. This is an attempt to produce a gazetteer and interactive map of all known “lost” churches and similar institutions in the town. Please click on the map to access the interactive map … The buildings that have disappeared can be categorised in at least two […]

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George Gilbert Scott

Sir George Gilbert Scott (1811-1878) and St Peter’s Northampton

Maybe the name is familiar, perhaps it’s not, it should be! He designed the Midland Hotel at St Pancras Station.

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Lost churches: St Bartholomew and St Lawrence

One church or two? There is an outstanding mystery about the location of this lost church and whether it was two separate churches or just one. Let’s examine the evidence. Although scanty, there is enough historical evidence to identify one of the sites. Traces of a medieval church There are two descriptions of the remains […]

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Royal carriage 1843

Queen Victoria’s railway carriage of 1843

The carriage constructed for her Majesty’s use, by the directors of the London and Birmingham Railway Company

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Arrival of Queen Victoria at All Saints church, Northampton

“A right Royal visit” Queen Victoria’s visit to Northampton

12 November 1844 was set to be a great day for Northampton. A chance to welcome Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. to the town. However, two tragedies would occur. It was a visit of convenience for the royal couple, who were passing through the town en route to Burghley House the residence of Marquess of […]

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18th century engraving of All Saints, Northampton showing the extent of the graveyard

Lost churches: All Saints, Northampton

Of course All Saints, Northampton is not ‘lost’, it is there in plain sight and for 300 years has been an iconic feature of the town. This building, however, is not the first church on this site. The original All Saints (or All Hallows, as it was sometimes known) was tragically damaged by a fire […]

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Northampton in 1899 showing the location of the original terminus of the railway in Northampton

Northampton’s forgotten railway

Most railway enthusiasts in Northampton will be well aware that the first railway station in Northampton was on the Blisworth to Peterborough extension of the London and Birmingham railway. The town’s first passenger station was located in Bridge Street and opened in 1845. However, this was not the first railway in the town. At the […]

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