My genealogy

 
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This site includes material in several sections covering my family research and nonconformist history especially those connected with Northamptonshire.  This is covered in two ways, firstly giving readers an idea of my research interests and secondly encouraging you to contact me if our interests overlap either by the family or by location of interest. There are also some pages with some detailed information relating to Nonconformists in Northamptonshire and surrounding areas, with particular reference to the Baptists in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Other areas to explore:

Northamptonshire Clock and Watchmakers Index

My Virtual Library of Nonconformist Books

Some books of interest to my research

Sources for researching Nonconformists in Northamptonshire

by Graham Ward

The Northamptonshire Family History Society have published a booklet written by myself as a guide to the multitude of resources available when researching nonconformist history and family connections.  Details are available here, together with a summary of the web sites referred to in the booklet.

Available from the Northamptonshire Family History Society bookstall for £2.50 plus postage (UK 45p, airmail £1.40) ISBN 1904460275, Published November 2004

Edward Vorley, His Life and Correspondence

by Graham Ward

Edward Vorley was the first known pastor of what was to later become Providence Baptist Church in Northampton from 1796 until 1807.  From 1807 until his death in 1838 he was pastor of the Baptist Church meeting in Ebenezer chapel, St Peter’s Lane, Leicester.“Edward Vorley, His Life and Correspondence” which contains a short biography and the complete text of all the known letters of Edward Vorley.

Available from The Huntingtonian Press, 72a Upper Northam Road, Hedge End, Southampton, Hampshire, UK, SO30 4EB  Telephone/Fax: 01489 786260. ISBN 1901670198, 72 pages, Published July 2005.  The cost is £3.00 (plus p & p) .

The 1851 Religious Census of Northamptonshire

by Graham Ward

One of the main features of Victorian local history was the balance between the religious denominations, which varied from place to place. The one and only time a religious census was taken in this country was in 1851. This exercise was undertaken alongside the regular census, taken every ten years from 1801. This volume gives a synopsis of the returns of each place of religious worship in every place in the county, and Graham Ward, the editor, explains the problems inherent in the way the census was designed and looks at issues raised by this one and only attempt to measure religious allegiance with statistical precision.

This is a Victor Hatley Memorial volume available from the Northamptonshire Record Society Wotton Hall Park, Northampton, UK, NN4 8BQ  Telephone: 01604 762297. ISBN 0 901275 65 4, 266 pages, Published 2007.  The cost is £9.50 (plus p & p) .

Providence, Northampton

by Antony Solomon & Graham S. Ward

Although one of the lesser known nonconformist churches in Northampton the Baptist congregation by the name of Providence has stood witness in the town since 1792. It can now claim to be Northampton’s oldest Baptist church. This book traces the church’s antecedents through the early part of the 1700s. The story of Providence itself begins with the exclusion of some members from the much larger and well known Baptist chapel in College Lane. The events that led to the new meeting were as a consequence of a visit to the town by William Huntington. Huntington was not invited to use the College Lane meeting but two of the members there, James Hewitt and John Adams made alternative arrangements in the town. Edward Vorley was the first known pastor of what was to later become Providence Baptist Church in Northampton from 1796 until 1807. By the 1820s Providence had obtained the use of a permanent building in Fish Lane (later Fish Street), subsequently moving to a new building at the north end of Abington Street where they remained until the end of World War II. Although now numerically a much reduced congregation, new opportunities presented themselves in a move to a new housing estate on the east of the town. Antony Solomon, a former member of the church and Graham Ward have collaborated to produce this record to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the chapel at The Headlands, Northampton. The book includes, in addition to the record of the church life, lists of members from 1810 to 1883, four pages of photographs and background to events in the wider Baptist witness in Northampton, adding to the story of the nonconformist heritage of the town.

Published by the Fauconberg Press and available from The Strict Baptist Historical Society,  ISBN 978 0 900366 16 1, 81 pages, Published March 2007.  The cost is £4.80 (including p & p in the UK).

Marianne Farningham

by Linda Wilson

A Plain Working Woman Marianne Farningham, of College Street Baptist Chapel, Northampton, was a household name in evangelical circles in the later nineteenth century. For over fifty years she produced comment, poetry, biography and fiction for the popular Christian press.

This investigation uses her writings to explore the beliefs and behaviour of evangelical Nonconformists, including Baptists, during these years.

Linda Wilson is a tutor in Church History with the Open Theological College, UK,

Published by Paternoster, ISBN 9781842271247

Marianne Hearn (aka. Marianne Farningham) of College Street Baptist, writer and hymn writer, including “Just as I am, Thine own to be”

 

 Posted by at 7:37 am